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1-800-222-1222

When accidents happen with chemicals, medicine, or household items, call Poison Help. Get help right away from a local poison expert.

If someone is unconscious or has trouble breathing, call 911.

The Poison Help website will experience a temporary service outage on Saturday, July 2, 2016 for scheduled server maintenance. We apologize for the inconvenience.

What Can You Do?

Poison Proof Your Home

More than 90 percent of the time, poisonings happen in people’s homes.1 The majority of these poisonings occur in the kitchen, bathroom and bedroom.2 That is why it is important to follow simple steps to prevent a poisoning from happening at home.

Teach your family to never touch or put anything in their mouths unless they know what it is. Below are additional tips on how to keep poisonous items safe in your home. Remember, if you suspect that you or someone you know has been poisoned, immediately call the toll-free Poison Help line (1-800-222-1222), which connects you to your local poison center.

Medicines

Carbon monoxide (CO)

Household products

Chemicals

Back to school/art supplies

Food

Animals/insects

Plants, mushrooms, and berries

 

Medicines 

  • Keep medicines in their original containers, properly labeled, and store them appropriately.
  • Call the toll-free Poison Help line (1-800-222-1222), which connects you to your local poison center, if you suspect someone has been poisoned.
  • Visit the Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) section for more details.

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Carbon monoxide (CO) 

  • Have a working carbon monoxide detector in your home. The best places for a CO detector are near bedrooms and close to furnaces. 
  • Call the toll-free Poison Help line (1-800-222-1222), which connects you to your local poison center, if you suspect someone has been poisoned.
  • Visit the Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) section for more details.

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Household products 

  • Keep products in their original containers. Do not use food containers (such as cups or bottles) to store household cleaners and other chemicals or products.
  • Keep all laundry products locked up, high, and out of the reach of children. Learn more. Exit Disclaimer
  • Call the toll-free Poison Help line (1-800-222-1222), which connects you to your local poison center, if you suspect someone has been poisoned.
  • Visit the Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) section for more details.

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Chemicals 

  • Keep antifreeze and all chemicals and household products in their original containers.
  • Call the toll-free Poison Help line (1-800-222-1222), which connects you to your local poison center, if you suspect someone has been poisoned.
  • Visit the Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) section for more details.

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Back to school/art supplies 

  • Some art products are mixtures of chemicals. They can be dangerous if not used correctly. Make sure children use art products safely by reading and following directions.
  • Do not eat or drink while using art products.
  • Wash skin after contact with art products. Clean equipment. Wipe tables, desks, and counters.
  • Keep art products in their original containers.
  • Call the toll-free Poison Help line (1-800-222-1222), which connects you to your local poison center, if you suspect someone has been poisoned.
  • Visit the Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) section for more details.

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Food 

  • Wash hands and counters before preparing all food.
  • Store food at the proper temperatures. Refrigerated foods should not be left out at temperatures above 40 degrees F (5 degrees C).
  • Use clean utensils for cooking and serving.
  • Call the toll-free Poison Help line (1-800-222-1222), which connects you to your local poison center, if you suspect someone has been poisoned.
  • Visit the Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) section for more information about food safety and common signs of food poisoning.

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Animals/insects 

  • Know what poisonous snakes live in your area and wear proper attire (boots, etc.) when hiking outdoors.
  • Check the label on any insect repellent. Be aware that most contain DEET, which can be poisonous in large quantities.
  • Contact the toll-free Poison Help line (1-800-222-1222), which connects you to your local poison center, if you suspect you or someone you know has been bitten by and animal or insect. Poison experts can confirm if the bite is poisonous.
  • Visit the Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) section for more details.

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Plants, mushrooms and berries 

  • Be sure that everyone in your family can identify poisonous mushrooms and plants. Remember when it comes to poison ivy, "leaves of three, let it be." 
  • Call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222, which connects you to your local poison center, if you are unsure what you or someone you know has eaten.
  • Visit the Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) section for more details.

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 1. Bronstein AC,  Spyker DA Cantilena LR, Green JL, Rumack BH, Giffin SL. 2008 Annual Report of the American Association of Poison Control Centers’ National Poison Data System (NPDS): 26th Annual Report. 2009. Clinical Toxicology (2009) 47, 911–1084. Exit Disclaimer

2. Cincinnati Drug and Poison Information Center (DPIC) Exit Disclaimer